Monday, 22 July 2019

BIG TECH: Apple's Credit Card, Google's Digital Gold, and IBM's Crypto Custody show the reckoning is here

After years of existential angst from finance executives about the big tech companies entering financial services, it is time to pay the piper.
Excuses like regulatory cost and complexity, strategic disinterest, and complexity of products are incrementally falling away each and every day. Across every single vertical, something is nipping at the banker's ankles. The splashiest announcement came from Apple, which launched a credit card backed by Goldman Sachs (the storied mass retail financial firm!) and transacted over the MasterCard network. You can sign up for the card directly from your phone, which integrates it into Apple Wallet and Apple Pay, and provides a 2% cash back on all transactions made with ApplePay. There are no fees on the card other than an interest rate on credit.

For Apple, this financial product is one of a thousand features within their platform. It is no more or less important than music, video, news, email, or podcasts. The presence of credit makes customers more sticky within the ecosystem, offering 3% cash back on all Apple purchases. For Goldman, this is a leapfrog into the consumer market, riding a much better recognized and respected retail brand. Finance for the wealthy is just not cool anymore in the era of Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Meanwhile in India, Google and Facebook are battling with Paytm over payments. Facebook's rumored cryptocurrency will target sending remittance over WhatsApp. Google, on the other hand, is working on a service to add a savings account to money movement. This account will be backed by custodied gold, and may include expanded wealth management products -- from mutual funds to insurance -- in the future. None of this should be surprising, as Chinese tech companies have been providing mobile search bundled with online shopping, saving, investing and payments for the last five years. These Asian companies are moving into Europe and the US, sometimes by investing in neobanks or through acquisitions. Our American tech companies are moving into Asia.

Let's round out the whole thing with IBM, the OG of American tech companies. Several young firms like BitGo, Gemini, and Kingdom Trust have all built custody for crypto assets, including a notable recent announcement from Trustology about bringing custody to the iPhone. But IBM is now moving into the space, leveraging its expertise from working on enterprise blockchain projects via Hyperledger. What's important to understand is that financial products -- including their embedded capital, credit and investment risks -- are transforming from legal paper to software. And as that happens, it is technology companies that are best positioned to hold, analyze, report on, and safekeep our money. Among the incumbents, Goldman, JP Morgan, BBVA, Santander, DBS, BlackRock, Schwab, Fidelity, NASDAQ, ICE and several others get it. So many others think it is a false alarm. Which side are you on?


source: autonomous.com
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